Great Conservatories of the 19th Century & The Architecture Behind Them

Posted October 26th, 2017 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Community, Events, Insights, latest, Lectures, Preservation Maryland
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Will you be attending?

Alan Stein says that the more he learned about building conservatories, the more impressed he became.

The co-founder of Tanglewood Conservatories with his wife, Nancy Virts, Alan will give a lecture on “Great Conservatories of the 19th Century & The Architecture Behind Them” at 6 p.m. Nov. 2 at the Rawlings Conservatory in Baltimore. Wine and light fare will be served at 5:30 p.m.

Joining Alan will be Daniel Russoniello, AIA, of Archer & Buchanan Architecture in Philadelphia. Dan has many years of experience in planning and design of institutional and commercial projects. He has worked with botanical gardens around the country and will speak about the relevance of conservatories in the modern age.

 “Conservatories are not well understood,” Alan said, “and the importance and impact they had on architecture is not well appreciated.” He said he’ll “take people back to when they were first invented, the forces behind their development … and the sociological, technological impacts they’ve had on art and architecture as well as everything from city planning to shopping.

An architect and builder, he said he always liked building things. He was asked to design and build a conservatory. “So we figured out how to build it. And then, somebody else asked for one. After the second one, we fell in love with them.” Tanglewood was founded about 25 years ago. Alan has also written a book, “Conservatories,” that covers the historical development and modern relevance of the conservatory, topics he’ll address Nov. 2.

The Rawlings Conservatory opened in 1888. It is the second-oldest steel framed-and-glass building still in use in the United States. Alan was visiting the Rawlings Conservatory some years ago and wanted to help preserve it and help it grow, hence his lecture, which benefits the conservatory.

People are still building conservatories now. The technology has really changed. Why are people still building conservatories? There must be something important about the role that they play and what they are used for,” he said.

You can learn more about that role at his talk on Nov. 2. He said, “It’s going to be really interesting.”

For information and tickets to the lecture, visit www.rawlingsconservatory.org.

 

 

 

 

A Greenhouse Gallery Art Auction

Posted October 12th, 2017 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Community, Events, Insights, latest, The Arts
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A note from the Rawlings Conservatory –

 

 

Works that reflect nature in several different media will be part of A Greenhouse Gallery Art Auction Oct. 20-29 at the Rawlings Conservatory in Baltimore.

As part of Free Fall Baltimore, the show is free to the public and is the second event in the Emergence Art Salon, which celebrates the synergy between art and the Conservatory.

Indeed, curator Kathleen Hamill, of K. Hamill Fine Art, has asked the artists to showcase work that is influenced by nature.

Preview party, Oct. 19 — The art will be for sale at a silent auction at the preview party from 6 to 9 p.m. Oct. 19, which will include live music and light refreshments. Remaining art will be on sale all week at the opening bid price.

The event is a fund-raiser for the Conservatory, with artists donating at least 30 percent of proceeds.

More than 25 artists will participate; for some of them this will be the first public showing of their work.

 

 

Among the artists are Wendy Doak, who says she is visually inspired by everything around her. “My subjects vary from still life to seascapes, and my style changes from impressionist to abstract depending on my mood.”

Artist Minás Konsolas develops his canvases by adding and eliminating multiple layers of paint. He creates his textured images by scraping and smearing. This process allows him to paint and draw at the same time, according to his website.

Stephen Reichert’s work includes non-representational markings and circles. Some marks are finely and meticulously applied with brush or knife while others are pulled or smeared in larger quantities across the canvas, wood or metal, with rubber, metal, wood and plastic objects, often repeated numerous times before completion.

The show will also include some photographs by Vivian Doering and other photographers, and perhaps even a performance art piece, Kathleen said.

She thanks the committee that is managing the auction and the hospitality: Rebecca Murphy, Angela Lykos, Mitzie Hughes and Jennie Ray.

Emergence Art Salon

Oct. 20-29, during regular Conservatory hours: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. Rawlings Conservatory, in Baltimore’s Druid Hill Park, at Gwynns Falls Parkway and McCulloh Street.

Greenhouse Gallery Auction: 6-9 p.m. Oct. 19

Also coming up: the Rawlings Conservatory will be part of Doors Open Baltimore Oct. 28-29, when more than 50 city buildings will be open for free tours. Details at www.doorsopenbaltimore.org.