Meet Ann Green, the Rawlings Conservatory’s New Director!

Posted March 21st, 2019 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Community, Events, latest

Article by Teresa Cook, Content Director | baltimorecooks@yahoo.com

Image courtesy of Rawlings Conservatory

Ann Green says she gets to work in a tropical paradise, so what’s not to like?

As the new director of that paradise, the Rawlings Conservatory in Baltimore, she loves to watch people’s reactions when they visit.

People are so blown away” by the plants and the building, and seeing that reaction is a real treat for her, she said.

Ann is not new to the Conservatory. She was the Volunteer Coordinator and Webmaster for seven years before her promotion to the top job.

Ann Green, Rawlings Conservatory Director

She’s always loved gardening. Growing up in the suburbs of Howard County, Ann said,

We three children were my mother’s and father’s little work horses. We did vegetable and flower gardening. It was the most fun chore there was, even weeding.”

Gardening has been a life-long passion since then. She tends ornamental, vegetable, and herb gardens in her yard in Baltimore, and cares for an extensive collection of houseplants.

With a bachelor’s degree in sociology and anthropology from St. Mary’s College and a master’s in Social Work from the University of Maryland, Ann has a background in non-profit management and community engagement that she is eager to put to work to grow the Conservatory.

For her graduate degree, she had an internship with the Friends of Druid Hill Park and helped get the farmers’ market established. From there, she was offered the volunteer coordinator job at the Conservatory.

Working with volunteers is so rewarding! Their work amplifies what our staff does in really remarkable ways,” she said.

She appreciates those volunteers, too — “We have so many dedicated volunteers” who make contributions in caring for plants as well as providing programming and visitor services. 

Now in her new post, she said she’s extremely busy, taking care of the plants and the facility with a staff of just two full-time and six part-time employees.  “The staff are awesome.” And don’t forget the four-legged staff – Conservatory cat, Mango, is a favorite of Ann’s.

The programming at the Conservatory has made a name for the Rawlings, she said. Seasonal shows, cocktail events, children’s programming and other educational programs bring in visitors. Local art teachers bring students to do painting or illustration projects which are then shown in the Conservatory. It’s a busy place, even on a winter afternoon.

For the future, Ann said a big capital project is in the planning stages: The original 130-year-old glass Palm House needs renovation. Re-design of the outdoor gardens and enclosing it in a deer-proof fence is another hoped-for improvement on her wish list.

Ann invites visitors to keep coming back. “The Conservatory changes all the time, even if you’ve been here, there is something different in bloom now. It’s a wonderful place to visit throughout the year.”

Spring events coming up at the Rawlings Conservatory

Image courtesy of the Rawlings Conservatory

“The Gnome and Garden Show” – April 6-21. The Conservatory’s annual spring show features hundreds of flowers grown from bulbs arranged with other spring plants and, this year, a scattering of garden gnomes. See how many little guys you can find among the blooms! Open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday.

Tree Baltimore’s Fruit Tree Fair, noon – 3 p.m. April 13. This year’s family-friendly atmosphere features a fruit tree giveaway, nature play space for kids, various environmental and community non-profit groups, food, and drink. Local emcee Alanah Nichole introduces various artists of all ages performing spoken word poetry and live music. Visit the vendor tents to learn about honey bees and native pollinators, plants for the orchard, and more! 

Community Gardening Day – May 23, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Help other volunteers, students and community members plant the outdoor gardens at the Conservatory and enjoy lunch provided by the Friends of the Rawlings Conservatory.

Visit Rawlingsconservatory.org for details on these and other events.

Inspiring the next generation – Maryland Manufacturing

Posted February 15th, 2019 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Community, Insights, latest, Preservation Maryland, Tanglewood News
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“Never underestimate the valuable and important difference you make in every life you touch…

For the impact you make today has a powerful rippling effect on every tomorrow.”

-Anonymous

Manufacturing gets another look…

To celebrate the real value of Manufacturing in Maryland, we must look beyond just recognizing great companies that bring value to our community.

Manufacturing is a MINDSET; it is the creation of innovative ideas. How do we inspire the “excitement for CREATING things” in our future workforce?

From the building of extraordinary glass architecture to custom, hand-crafted boats to beautiful architectural mesh, manufacturing is experiencing a renaissance of relevance.

In Maryland, manufacturing is responsible for over 104,000 jobs and the generation of $23.4 billion in gross state product. With such a strong impact in our community, the sustainability of a vibrant, skilled workforce is imperative. The next generation is inspired by this industry and our work with the Untangled Minds Foundation and the AMP Program are examples of just that!

We are honored to be recognized as Maryland MEP’s Manufacturer of the Month for the contributions to our community, clients, and partners. In our 25+ years of business, our mission to inspire everyone we touch through the creation of extraordinary glass architecture continues to touch lives around the world!

To learn more about our product lines and services, talk with Jennifer Beletsky at 410.479.4700!

Are We A Sustainable Company?

Posted January 17th, 2019 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Community, Insights, latest, Preservation Maryland, Tanglewood News, Untangled Minds Foundation
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What does sustainable mean?

Some think sustainability means you recycle, reduce energy, and are more efficient in operations. But at Tanglewood, we define sustainability differently. All of the efforts toward energy conservation and recycling are necessary but…

What is the goal of sustainability?

We believe to be sustainable means belonging to a vibrant, thriving community that will be a sustainable, cultural environment for our children and our children’s children.

What are we doing to accomplish that?

The Advanced Manufacturing Professionals (AMP) Program created through our 501c3 Untangled Minds seeks to help students acquire the skills and perspective every business owner wants to see in their employees. Bundled into a three semester course, the AMP program’s primary focus is to develop students who (1) Take ownership and initiative, (2) Seek to understand what owners and managers of a company are passionate about, and (3) See and do what is required without having to be asked or told.

Does that sound like an employee you would like to hire?

It is these skills wrapped around the technical skill component along with the strong partnership of community members, community businesses, and education that advances student skills, perspective, and ways of thinking.

After all, to establish a sustainable community, we first must develop a sustainable workforce for our growing business partners.

For more information about the AMP program and to become a partner, visit untangledminds.org or contact Nicole Mihalos at untangledminds@outlook.com

2018 Champions of Manufacturing STEM Awarded to Tanglewood’s Foundation for Education!

Posted December 4th, 2018 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Community, Insights, latest, Tanglewood News, Uncategorized, Untangled Minds Foundation
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Caroline County AMP students, founder of Untangled Minds Foundation, Alan Stein, Dr. Patricia W. Saelens Superintendent of Schools, Keith Hale, AMP classroom instructor receive the 2018 Champions of Maryland Manufacturing award for Stem Student Advocacy from Mike Galiazo (center), President of the Regional Manufacturing Institute of Maryland.

Have you heard AMP in the news?

To celebrate those in the manufacturing industry advocating for its growth in Maryland, each year the Regional Manufacturing Institute (RMI) recognizes several companies across the state of Maryland doing amazing things in the manufacturing industry in areas such as STEM Student Achievement and Recruitment, Innovation, and Community Engagements.

This year, the Advanced Manufacturing Professionals (AMP) Program of Caroline County Public Schools recently won RMI’s 2018 Champions of Manufacturing Award for STEM Student Advocates! Awarded to those striving to impact student achievement in manufacturing, we were humbled to have received the award from our peers out of 280 nominations from across the state of Maryland.

AMP was developed by the Untangled Minds Foundation, the brainchild of Alan Stein, founder of Tanglewood Conservatories in Denton, MD. The AMP program goes beyond the typical career and technology center manufacturing program. In addition to technical education, students learn about time and project management, cost estimating, team building, quality improvement process, communication, presentation, marketing and salesmanship.

A blend of training in modern manufacturing process-driven thinking and the Life Success Skills that employer’s need, the AMP program relies on industry partner companies to deliver a multi-disciplinary approach to project based learning that brings real-world experience into the classroom.

Visit untangledminds.org to learn more

Highlights from the Gala

Over 600 Manufacturing Stakeholders Enthusiastically Celebrate 2018 Champions of Maryland Manufacturing
 

 

On Thursday night at Martin’s West, RMI’s 2018 Champions of Maryland Manufacturing Awards ceremony drew over 600 stakeholders from around the State. The evening awards program touched on the themes of togetherness and family as we celebrated a variety of different leaders from young students to business executives.
Champions received their awards and also saw their Champions features in the newly published 2018 Champions Yearbook. Many Champion companies brought their respective teams of employees to the event to share the celebration.  It was obvious that all had a very good time.
There were many poignant moments, from the embracement of the attending employees from GM Baltimore Operations to Suzy Ganz and Mike Galiazzo’s tribute to Aris Melissaratos as the 2018 Grand Champions of Maryland Manufacturing.  Aris received a beautiful glass- blown bowl, see below, created with Maryland colors infused throughout, from Baltimore’s Magma Build Studios.

How do you sell a $29M unfinished masterpiece?

Posted November 15th, 2018 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Client Stories, Community, Conservatory Projects, latest, Pool Enclosures, Uncategorized
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Can an unfinished construction site be merchandised to inspire the buyer with its possibilities?

This unfinished 16,800 Sq. Ft. Grosse Ile, MI Manor with a spectacular Tanglewood Conservatory listed for $29M

 

 

This expansive 16,800 square foot Manor Home sitting just across the street from the Detroit River in Gross Ile, Michigan has hit the real estate market priced at $29,000,000. According to Sotheby’s International Realty, “one of the home’s most intriguing spaces is the 300 foot cast iron and glass Tanglewood Conservatory which comes prepped for a pool and cascading waterfall”.

The home has been sitting unfinished awaiting the right buyer to complete its old world grandeur. Among it many features are a five car garage, 8 bedrooms, 9 fireplaces, 8 bathrooms, 9 bathrooms, and marble and limestone details throughout the home. The Tanglewood Conservatory features numerous stained glass windows designed by architect M. Selman, beautiful steel and cast iron and custom copper work throughout.

 

 

See more of the property HERE!

To learn more about this conservatory project or to start one of your own, contact our team via online or call 410.479.4700

We look forward to talking with you!

Rawlings Conservatory Celebrates 130th Birthday

Posted November 8th, 2018 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Community, Events, latest, Uncategorized
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A Message from Rawlings Conservatory: 

The Rawlings Conservatory in Baltimore is 130 years old this year and it will celebrate its birthday in style this December. Built in 1888, the Conservatory is the second oldest glass house in the United States.

To celebrate, the Friends of the Rawlings Conservatory are hosting

 

“A Glistening Winter’s Evening in Baltimore’s Glass Palace”

Friday, Dec. 7th at 7:00 PM

 

The party will be set amid hundreds of flowers in the annual holiday poinsettia show, with a spectacular variety of poinsettias of all colors. The event will feature crafted cocktails, festive hors d’oeuvres and live jazz.

The party begins at 7 p.m. and tickets are $75 per person, available through the Conservatory’s website.

 

Come celebrate at one of Baltimore’s jewels!

RawlingsConservatory.org.

 

 

Upcoming Events At Rawlings

In December…

The Conservatory’s annual Holiday Poinsettia Show runs Dec. 1 to 30. Poinsettias, including many unusual varieties and colors, will be for sale throughout the show. No longer is red the main attraction, we have orange, pink with splashes of white, and variegated as well. The gift shop is also well-stocked with books, cards, and house plants.

Visit with Santa! On Dec. 2, visitors can meet Santa from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.

 

In January…

The conservatory will host an Orchid Show with the Maryland Orchid Society, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Friday – Sunday, January 11 – 13. Admission is free, $5 donation appreciated.

 

The orchid – the largest and most diverse flowering plant family on earth, loved for its unmatched exotic beauty – will be in the spotlight. The Conservatory, in partnership with the Maryland Orchid Society (MOS) is hosting the show exhibiting MOS members’ prize-winning plants. Meet with the Conservatory’s Orchid Specialist Friday and Sunday from 1 to 3 p.m.

 

 

For more information about events, the conservatory, and more visit

RawlingsConservatory.org

Tanglewood Amplifies Local Trade Talent through Untangled Minds’ AMP program!

Posted October 3rd, 2018 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Community, latest, Tanglewood News, Uncategorized, Untangled Minds Foundation
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Imagine… changing the lives of students, teachers, business leaders and an entire community…

Students of the Advanced Manufacturing Professionals (AMP) program dream of becoming a Master Craftsperson. One student’s passion for working with his hands led to a summer internship at Tanglewood.

Tanglewood intern awarded Golden Saw from Tanglewood Engineer and AMP Teacher/Mentor, Mike Panschisin

 

Throughout his internship, he experienced woodworking, metalwork, handling glass, painting, construction, and CNC machining, while helping craft Tanglewood’s luxury conservatories.

 

“He is a wonderful asset to our team. He has a great outlook and attitude. The students in the AMP program learn what we call “Discovery Development”; how to take ownership, think like a business owner and be coachable. We are excited and look forward to having him back in the Spring.”

Alan Stein, Tanglewood President and Director of Architecture

 

A Program of Opportunity

Working alongside and learning from local industry professionals, students are currently designing and constructing a Cajon while preparing to take their Manufacturing Skills Standards Council certification; a nationally recognized industry program for advanced manufacturing professionals. The Cajón is the most popular and widely used Afro-Peruvian musical instrument for the last 200 years and is now used not only in Cuban and Peruvian music but by folk musicians, Flamenco musicians, acoustic groups, street musicians (buskers) and increasingly, professional mainstream artists. Students went all out on this project! The intricate detailing of this Cajon will test their skills.

AMP student learns the intricacies of dovetail joinery as they work on the final assembly of their custom designed Cajon project alongside a master craftsmen from partner Hinckley Yachts.

 

 

By the end of the semester, students will pursue internships with local businesses specialized in the trades.

To follow the AMP students’ progress, subscribe to their newsletter HERE.

 

Giving Back

AMP is just one of the many ways Tanglewood is giving back to our community and passing on our skills to the next generation. The program’s advanced approach to project-based learning fused with personal development is preparing students well in advance to walk into well-paying jobs and good benefits right out of high school.

To learn more about the AMP program and the Untangled Minds Foundation, visit https://www.untangledminds.org/amp-1

To support our youth in discovering their life vision and passions through advanced manufacturing and woodworking, donate here.

 

Tanglewood, Untangled Minds, and the AMP program are proud partners with the Mid-Shore Community Foundation, Caroline County Public Schools, and several industry partners across Maryland’s Eastern Shore

Unique Conservatories – What Is The Attraction?

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Is it a trend… or a lifestyle…?

 

 

According to Mansion Magazine,

“Home designers are turning to a time-honored transparent transition: the conservatory… these spectacular bespoke glass houses were symbols of wealth from the 17th through the 19th centuries, [and have] become an integral architectural element in luxurious homes and high-rises around the globe”.

 Nancy Ruhling, writer for Mansion Magazine, recently interviewed Tanglewood President, Alan Stein, to understand why people are incorporating these unique structures into the design of their homes. Why?

When he and his wife, Nancy Virts, founded Tanglewood Conservatories over 25 years ago, they discovered this growing trend for the fascination of conservatories and greenhouses and our client’s desire to live in them. In their 25 years, the major shift they have seen is in their use; from traditional living spaces attached to the home to a more exotic space not only for living but for growing plants. Conservatories have become a part of their everyday lives, creating memories and living out their passions daily.

 

According to Alan,

“Today, greenhouses are much more popular at the high end of the market than they were 15 to 20 years ago.”

As the conservatory lifestyle grows, designers, architects, and owners are incorporating these glass room as key design features when remodeling or designing new homes.

Alan mentioned,

“They add a magical sense—the light coming in from above allows you to see the room in a significantly different way… every element is exposed, it’s a piece of art, not just another room. And that is exactly why people are falling in love with the conservatory.”

 

So how are owners around the globe using these rooms?

Elegant steel and glass pool pavilion, which became the highlight of a large renovation project. Cast iron and aluminum details stylishly complement the work.

LEARN MORE

 

The conservatory is one of three focal pieces in the Pagoda Garden project conceptually designed by Gilkey and Jannopoulo. The project consists of different vignettes or “rooms” that present unique aspects of Asian design — a grouping of authentic Chinese Pagodas, a one of a kind koi pond, and a greenhouse in the conservatory style.

LEARN MORE

 

Designed and built using cast stone and copper, this unique garden bar is the focal point of every gathering.

LEARN MORE

 

Are you fascinated by the conservatory lifestyle?

Call us today to talk about your vision for bringing this timeless piece of art to life.

We look forward to working with you and your team.

410 479 4700 | Tell Us About Your Vision | A Client Story

The Rawlings Conservatory “An empty pot is just a pot full of wishes!”

Posted June 21st, 2018 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Community
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Kate Blom accepting Rawlings Conservatory plaque by Tanglewood Conservatories

 

An empty pot is just a pot full of wishes,” Kate Blom says. Her response is to think, “Okay let me make you beautiful.” That is what she did for the Rawlings Conservatory in Baltimore during her 18½-year tenure as director.

She was in charge when the Conservatory grew from an aging glass house with some dirt-floored greenhouses into one of Baltimore’s jewels. Major renovations in 2004 preserved the original Palm House, dating to 1888, and updated the greenhouses that now house plants from three climates – Mediterranean, tropical and desert.

As she retired from her post this month, Kate looked back on the changes and fun times. “It’s been great. I’m grateful to so many people along the road, lots of good people.”

She started in December 1999 when the renovations were still just plans. “We were programming as best we could, getting ready for renovations, figuring out what plants to keep.”

The groundbreaking in 2002 is one of her favorite memories. And the grand re-opening in 2004 was even better.

“When the first school buses came after the renovation, it made me cry,” she said. “I thought, ‘they’re coming!’”

She’s especially proud of the Conservatory’s programs for children, such as Little Leaves, which brings city second graders to the Conservatory to discover and learn about plants.

“Little Leaves is just incredible … Watching a kid look at a banana tree and get it.” She said she always wanted to work with children and the Conservatory programs now are “really changing lives, making a difference. That’s always important.”

 

Among her many memories, she recalls the day a big limousine arrived and out stepped Maryland Comptroller and former governor and mayor William Donald Schaefer. “I gave him a tour, showed him our plans. He was pleased. That was nice.” Then there was the time she looked at the guest book to see it had been signed by Oprah, who wrote “My Baltimore!” As Kate said, “Darn, I missed her.”

She learned that it’s not so bad to hold a boa constrictor, when she helped save one that was found freezing outside the Conservatory. And she had lots of fun putting on the annual poinsettia and spring flower shows. She recalls the Conservatory getting its own web page and how that “put us on the map.”

The conservatory is a popular wedding venue now, with at least one every week, sometimes two or three.

And of course, there are the plants. She was “seeing something new every day,” different plants blooming, some for the first time since being planted.

In all, she said, it’s been “A wonderful job. The best in the city.

And it wasn’t her first career. Kate was born in Baltimore and graduated from the University of Maryland with a degree in journalism. It was the time of the Pentagon Papers news and Kate was determined to get a job at the Washington Post. “Katherine Graham was a big hero for me.” She managed to get hired as a copy aide first, and then spent 22 years in advertising sales. When she moved to Baltimore, the commute and family obligations proved to be too much and she decided to do something different.

She’d always liked plants, watching watermelon seeds grow into a plant when she was a child, filling her home with plants. So she took courses at Dundalk Community College in horticulture, took Master Gardener classes and worked in nurseries. After visiting public gardens with her classes, she decided that is where she wanted to work. Then she landed the job at the Conservatory.

As for retirement, Kate is enjoying the free time now, working in her own garden and helping her sister who is dealing with illness. She also has a son and two grandchildren she can spend time with and she wants to hang out and travel with her longtime friend, Maggie. “I feel lighter in many ways; my priorities are where they should be.”

 

Her wishes for the Conservatory? She has a potful.

First is the renovation of the historic Palm House with “a 100-year fix, not just a 20-year Band Aid.” Plans for a feasibility study are underway now.

She’d also like to see the fulfilling of the master plan for more space, another building for administration, space for shows. More children’s programs, more staff. “I just want more of everything, bigger gardens,” she said.

“I really think Baltimore deserves and should have a first-rate Conservatory and botanical garden. It helps a city grow.”

 

By Teresa Cook, Rawlings Conservatory | www.rawlingsconservatory.org/

What Makes Great Architecture | Ken Tate

Posted June 6th, 2018 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Client Stories, Community, Pool Enclosures, Steel Structures
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What is great architecture?

Is great architecture the timeless notion of beauty? Need it be eternally memorable from creation, obliged to tell a thousand stories?

Must great architecture exhibit bold and purposeful innovation? Should it express its function in an interesting and meaningful way, demanding admiration for its immodest assertion?

Is great architecture a strangely familiar reaffirming of tradition? Expertly crafted to solicit a strong visceral reaction, stirring us at an almost spiritual level?

Does great architecture conform to universal laws of symmetry and proportion? Should it resonate with its surroundings and faithfully appeal to our sense of balance?

According to ancient Roman architect, Vitruvius, architecture is as much math and science as it is philosophy and art. His famous treatise, De Architectura, outlined three fundamental principles essential for architecture; balanced elements of firmitas, utilitas and venustas. In fact, the same theory still applies to architectural design today.

Likewise, award-winning architect, Ken Tate, carefully observes truth in Vitruvius’ basic principles by stating great architecture is a harmony of “composition, proportion and materials”, that when combined, exudes a “certain self-confidence.”

Self-described as an intuitive classicist, Tate is the recipient of a Shute Award from the Institute of Classical Architecture and three-time winner of the Southern Home Award from Southern Progress Corporation. His instinctive and open-minded approach to design has been featured in many magazines including Southern Living, Period Homes and Architectural Digest on numerous occasions; one of which was steel and glass pool pavilion designed and build in partnership with Tanglewood Conservatories. Widely recognized for his unrestrained imagination and awe-inspiring design aesthetic, Tate’s “creative approach is never quite the same from project to project.”

For Tate and architects alike, asking them what makes great architecture is “like asking Mozart how to create music”. It is, indeed, a subjective question. Almost indescribable – great architecture embodies a sense of “clarity to it where everything makes sense.” Artistic focus and detailed application of design create a balanced and harmonic architectural melody.

Individual to each architect’s imagination, Tate describes architecture “as something beautiful, not meant to show off”. It is quite simply a work of artistic genius. “You just know it when you see it.”

 

What distinguishes great architecture from good architecture?

This is sometimes difficult to discern. Most often the distinction is found in the smallest design details. It is the conscious consideration and polishing of each design component, such as window sills, paneling styles, door casings, hardware and the like.

 

“God is in the details.” – Mies van der Rohe

 

Like architect Ken Tate, Tanglewood also recognizes the importance of fundamental design details.

We invite you to marvel at our most recent partnership with architect Ken Tate. Tate’s carefully articulated vision of “old-world” style, paired with Tanglewood’s custom design and expert craftsmanship, inspired the creation of an extraordinary steel and glass pool pavilion. This project is sure to captivate your imagination and inspire your own creativity.

 

Are you thinking about transforming your home into a luxurious retreat?

Let’s talk about your vision for your next home renovation. Contact us online or at 410.479.4700 to start the conversation.