Great Conservatories of the 19th Century & The Architecture Behind Them

Posted October 26th, 2017 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Community, Events, Insights, latest, Lectures, Preservation Maryland
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Will you be attending?

Alan Stein says that the more he learned about building conservatories, the more impressed he became.

The co-founder of Tanglewood Conservatories with his wife, Nancy Virts, Alan will give a lecture on “Great Conservatories of the 19th Century & The Architecture Behind Them” at 6 p.m. Nov. 2 at the Rawlings Conservatory in Baltimore. Wine and light fare will be served at 5:30 p.m.

Joining Alan will be Daniel Russoniello, AIA, of Archer & Buchanan Architecture in Philadelphia. Dan has many years of experience in planning and design of institutional and commercial projects. He has worked with botanical gardens around the country and will speak about the relevance of conservatories in the modern age.

 “Conservatories are not well understood,” Alan said, “and the importance and impact they had on architecture is not well appreciated.” He said he’ll “take people back to when they were first invented, the forces behind their development … and the sociological, technological impacts they’ve had on art and architecture as well as everything from city planning to shopping.

An architect and builder, he said he always liked building things. He was asked to design and build a conservatory. “So we figured out how to build it. And then, somebody else asked for one. After the second one, we fell in love with them.” Tanglewood was founded about 25 years ago. Alan has also written a book, “Conservatories,” that covers the historical development and modern relevance of the conservatory, topics he’ll address Nov. 2.

The Rawlings Conservatory opened in 1888. It is the second-oldest steel framed-and-glass building still in use in the United States. Alan was visiting the Rawlings Conservatory some years ago and wanted to help preserve it and help it grow, hence his lecture, which benefits the conservatory.

People are still building conservatories now. The technology has really changed. Why are people still building conservatories? There must be something important about the role that they play and what they are used for,” he said.

You can learn more about that role at his talk on Nov. 2. He said, “It’s going to be really interesting.”

For information and tickets to the lecture, visit www.rawlingsconservatory.org.

 

 

 

 

A Greenhouse Gallery Art Auction

Posted October 12th, 2017 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Community, Events, Insights, latest, The Arts
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A note from the Rawlings Conservatory –

 

 

Works that reflect nature in several different media will be part of A Greenhouse Gallery Art Auction Oct. 20-29 at the Rawlings Conservatory in Baltimore.

As part of Free Fall Baltimore, the show is free to the public and is the second event in the Emergence Art Salon, which celebrates the synergy between art and the Conservatory.

Indeed, curator Kathleen Hamill, of K. Hamill Fine Art, has asked the artists to showcase work that is influenced by nature.

Preview party, Oct. 19 — The art will be for sale at a silent auction at the preview party from 6 to 9 p.m. Oct. 19, which will include live music and light refreshments. Remaining art will be on sale all week at the opening bid price.

The event is a fund-raiser for the Conservatory, with artists donating at least 30 percent of proceeds.

More than 25 artists will participate; for some of them this will be the first public showing of their work.

 

 

Among the artists are Wendy Doak, who says she is visually inspired by everything around her. “My subjects vary from still life to seascapes, and my style changes from impressionist to abstract depending on my mood.”

Artist Minás Konsolas develops his canvases by adding and eliminating multiple layers of paint. He creates his textured images by scraping and smearing. This process allows him to paint and draw at the same time, according to his website.

Stephen Reichert’s work includes non-representational markings and circles. Some marks are finely and meticulously applied with brush or knife while others are pulled or smeared in larger quantities across the canvas, wood or metal, with rubber, metal, wood and plastic objects, often repeated numerous times before completion.

The show will also include some photographs by Vivian Doering and other photographers, and perhaps even a performance art piece, Kathleen said.

She thanks the committee that is managing the auction and the hospitality: Rebecca Murphy, Angela Lykos, Mitzie Hughes and Jennie Ray.

Emergence Art Salon

Oct. 20-29, during regular Conservatory hours: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. Rawlings Conservatory, in Baltimore’s Druid Hill Park, at Gwynns Falls Parkway and McCulloh Street.

Greenhouse Gallery Auction: 6-9 p.m. Oct. 19

Also coming up: the Rawlings Conservatory will be part of Doors Open Baltimore Oct. 28-29, when more than 50 city buildings will be open for free tours. Details at www.doorsopenbaltimore.org.

Who is the leader in American Classicism?

Posted April 26th, 2017 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Events, Insights, latest, Uncategorized
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Who is John Russell Pope?

Best known for his design of the Jefferson Memorial and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, John Russell Pope set the precedence for monumental architecture. Pope designed the National Archives Building, Constitution Hall, and the Temple of the Scottish Right. Renowned for his interpretation of European classicism in a new American form, Architect and historian, Stephen M. Bedford, described Pope as a “leader in the development of highly refined and restrained American classicism.

Why he is such an important figure in the world of classical design? Take a look at some of the works he’s completed in his lifetime. Great conservatory architecture invites you to linger and enjoy its rich details, fanciful embellishments, and sensuous curves just as these historical details allow.

House of the Temple – Washington D.C. 1915

 

Tate Gallery – London, England1897

 

British Museum – London, England

 

Thomas Jefferson Memorial – Washington, DC 1943

 

Skylands – New Jersey 1922

 

The Institute of Classical Architecture & Art Washington Mid Atlantic Chapter is pleased to announce the 2017 John Russell Pope Awards, recognizing excellence in classical architecture, artisanship, interior design, and landscape architecture.

The Awards recognize the best work of individuals who contribute to the creation of classical and traditional architecture in the Washington Mid Atlantic region. On April 21, 2017, the ICAA hosted the Awards ceremony. Tanglewood is honored to be a supporter and sponsor.

As classical architecture becomes increasingly re-discovered, the ICAA offers a forum for practitioners, enthusiasts, and students.

 

 

When academic success does not equal economic success, then what?

Posted April 5th, 2017 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Insights, latest, Untangled Minds Foundation
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When academic success does not equal economic success, then what?

Statistics show that the underprivileged and undereducated are often lost in poverty, making choices for survival that render them less than successful. There are also stories of those who have achieved educational goals, only to find that their success in education may not equate to economic success. So, does THAT education matter? Education does matter; but, not education for education’s sake. Then, is it possible to acquire economic success without a college degree? Emphatically, yes! It is possible to be successful with AND without a college degree. However, we must encourage our young workforce to follow a mapped path that focusses their educational journey toward an achievable destination that fulfills their personal and economic goals.

Tanglewood Conservatories and Untangled Minds, Inc. recognizes the challenges students face as they consider steps toward their future, and see the need for a change in mindset regarding alternate paths of education. It is imperative that our youth are able to follow a mapped path to success. Mapping their educational journey through alternatives means that our youth can acquire the knowledge they need to successfully develop a business career from business leaders who are already successful.

Although college is a viable means for acquiring education, the gravitas of methods that provide experience through hands-on training is priceless. HANDS-ON TRAINING offers tools for scientific and artistic justification, documenting the why and the how of an operation, and a visualization of the process from beginning to end. Projects, such as the Advanced Manufacturing Production (AMP) program provides community youth with hands-on learning experience, by placing them side-by-side with experts in the field.  These experts volunteer time, talent and other valuable resources, to teach students every aspect of the industry from concept to delivery. Students that apply themselves, following to completion this educational journey, are positioned toward a lifetime of achievement and economic success.

Do you remember career day in grade school?

The pride and excitement as a parade of professionals marched through in their uniforms, giving all the highlights and perks of their specialty. Remember, after the fanfare had ended, being tickled playing dress-up, or having fanciful dreams; awed by so many options. Had you considered them all? Did you wonder? Or did you already know, when asked, “What do you want to be when you grow up?”

Early exposure to field professionals can encourage students to explore their interests and delve deeper into what those industries have to offer.  The beauty of this is that once a student’s interest is realized, passion can be cultivated. Early cultivation done properly is the secret to shaping a true industry leader. The Untangled Minds Foundation specializes in cultivating the passion of youth, by infusing students with confidence in their ability to present innovative creations that will drive industry to unimaginable heights. Through the AMP program students are provided a unique experience, immersed in every aspect of the business.

Our partnership with both the local high school and an accredited technical college ensure a superior level of working knowledge to support technical skills they will acquire through hands on training. Focusing on molding industry leaders, our expectation of students is high, as is our standard of professionals with whom they are paired. Additionally, we are committed to their variety in knowledge. Therefore, students are allowed to sit in on, and learn about each position, from shop supervisor to owner.

One aspect of our training that differentiates us from others is the entrepreneurial mindset of our culture, which is reflected in our methodology, as well as, our pragmatism. Once a student leaves our program they have the knowledge, skills, and understanding for each responsibility, along with the experience to take it on. We know the key to cultivating passion is constant exposure, hands on interaction, encouragement and organic talent acquisition. Their pride, confidence and ability will drive their immediate economic success and financial freedom.

AMP is a cooperative effort among community and industry leaders to introduce young students to the structure and strategies of business development. Tanglewood Conservatories is excited to talk about the AMP program with industry leaders and individuals that have a heart and interest in making a difference in their communities.

Contact Patrick Reed for more information about how you can make a difference. 410.479.4700

What opportunity do our high school students and local businesses share?

Posted November 30th, 2016 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Events, Insights, latest
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A community group gathered at Tanglewood Conservatories to build a bridge between high school student’s job opportunities and local business needs.

“It was fantastic to see such a great turn out!”

Jennifer, Tanglewood Team

Wednesday evening saw local teachers, parents, students, high school and college administrators, and local business leaders gather at Tanglewood Conservatories to learn about efforts to develop a leadership and entrepreneurial centered skills program for students at the Caroline County Career and Technical Center.

The AMP program is being developed to provide both technical and Life Success Skills training that will prepare students to pursue rewarding, high-level positions in companies across the region. Graduating students will be members of a well-trained, engaged workforce sought after by companies and required for the future growth of our regional economy.

Why is this important to your business?

Imagine… having well-trained, skilled high school students ready to start work for you right after graduation. If you are interested, call us to discuss the partnership opportunities the AMP program offers!

 

About our Meeting

The evening began with a tour of Tanglewood’s design and production facilities which concluded a series of ten visits by local teachers to Eastern Shore manufacturing companies. The tours were organized by MEPE to give teachers and guidance counselors throughout the region insight into the types of skills needed by regional employers and the types of career opportunities that exist for students.

Following dinner, Josh Zimmerman CTE Business Liaison for Caroline County Public Schools presented an overview of the Advanced Manufacturing and Production program which is targeted to be introduced at CCTC this spring. Five students from the junior and senior class will be selected to participate in the pilot program before the program is introduced county wide.

A spirited discussion followed covering subjects ranging from how to help young people gain the qualities employers seek to how employers can think differently about building their teams.

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What’s to come of the AMP Program

At the heart of the AMP program’s Life Success Skills, is an entrepreneurial approach to leadership training which is designed to be applied in any academic or business environment.

Other exciting developments include the opportunity to work closely with Chesapeake College to extend the student opportunities by offering an articulated two year extension to the AMP program leading to students earning an Associate’s degree through Chesapeake College.

Will you join us in our efforts to build strong, successful students and businesses? Give us a call at 410.479.4700 to learn more!

 

 

What makes great conservatory design?

Posted November 16th, 2016 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Conservatory Projects, General, Insights
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Conservatory design is unique. The amount of knowledge, craftsmanship, research, and attention to design and detail greatly differs from the creation of any other room in the world. According to Bill Bertsche, with Mercer & Bertsche Architecture & Engineering, “…few architects have the experience required to design and detail a TRUE CONSERVATORY. You could approach it as a stick built room, could make a frame and put in glass and windows, but you’d miss the essence of what a GREAT CONSERVATORY should be – GLASS AND LIGHT.”

Great conservatory design secrets

“In architecture, two major factors determine the success or failure of a structure; the form and the function.”

For over 20 years, our expert designer has been designing some of the country’s most unique and innovative conservatories. From elegant greenhouses to luxurious conservatories to elegant pool enclosures, he always says two main elements create beautiful designs; a structures form and its intended function.

The trick, of course, is how to get there. Close attention to details, he points out, is integral to the process. According to our designer,

Eye pleasing form and specifically defined functions, whether it be a greenhouse, conservatory, or pool enclosure,  should complement each other and come together harmoniously to create a true conservatory design.”

Conservatories are works of art, carefully handcrafted to fit the specific needs of individuals and bring peace to your home. In his experience, harmony is created in the details. What sets conservatory design a part from say the design of your home or office building is the attention to detail not only in the furniture and items within the room and its function/purpose, but the details built into the core structure of the room itself. We approach every design as a blank sheet of paper with endless possibilities; as our designer always says, “I’ve been designing for Tanglewood for over 20 years and of all my favorites, they have one thing in common, I was given total freedom to design from scratch and each structure was built unlike anything else in the world.”

When we asked him what he liked best about designing for Tanglewood, he said, “We never build the same thing twice. Each and every conservatory is different and has its own unique personality and challenges. I’m often amazed at what we’re able to do. Of course, we learn from each one too. It never gets boring. The more complex and challenging the design the better I like them. I would not have lasted 21 years if I did not enjoy the work I do. It’s not just designing and building – we really are creating art.”

Why our clients want conservatories

The reasons our clients want conservatories are myriad. Many are looking to create a space to enjoy a sense of outdoor living no matter the weather outside. Many realize a glass conservatory creates the ideal place to retreat and commune with the beauty and ambience of growing plants and flowers.

Others look to add beautiful works of art to their home, and/or for their community. .One of our current clients is looking to design a conservatory to perfectly frame a stunning view while providing a serene place for personal and family re-creation of those undergoing medical treatment.

Families and friends make memories that last a lifetime and leave a legacy in these rooms. Imagine what that memories you and your family might make surrounded by such beauty.

What would you add to this list? What dreams might the idea of a well-designed conservatory spark in you?

Why we build conservatories

We love building these rooms because we feel they bring a sense of peace, tranquility, and rejuvenation to oneself; the enchantment these spaces bring is unlike anything we’ve ever experience before. We love the challenge of innovative design and using new materials to build truly classical spaces.steel_glass_3

But what is most satisfying, is bringing our clients visions to life; exactly how they envision it.
We start with a conversation with the owner and their team to discover exactly what it is they want to experience in their conservatory. With careful consideration and attention to detail, we turn their vision into hand-drawn renderings which, when the design is exactly what the client is looking for, we begin to bring those drawings to life. Each element in the construction is carefully considered to make sure it exceeds expectation whether it be specially laser carved steel beams or searching for an exact type of rare wood to set the tone of the room, it is important we do our part in creating the perfect atmosphere that will reflect the look and feel the client desires. We make sure your conservatory will appeal to all your senses, detail by detail.
Take a look at our e-brochure & read through it. It may spark your imagination in ways that both please and excite you.

What are some favorite designs?

“When we allow our imaginations to take flight, the results are amazing and often surprising. Anything is possible in conservatory architecture; we just have to break outside of the box and approach every new project as a blank sheet of paper and not trying to fit an existing idea into a preconceived box”

Do you have a favorite design? We can help you achieve the great conservatory design and feel you are searching for. Perhaps a no-cost 30 minute consultation would be a good place to start! To secure yours, call us at 410-479-4700 or fill out our form.

Do you know how glass conservatories can enhance your children’s health?

Posted October 5th, 2016 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Greenhouses, Insights, Uncategorized
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For many, glass conservatories and greenhouses are valued primarily for the availability of natural light they bring, particularly in the fall and winter months. What most families don’t realize is the major positive impact conservatories and greenhouses can offer to families anywhere in the world.

Although the tendency is to think of these spaces as primarily adult places, children of all ages can benefit greatly by spending time in there as well. In fact, family time in a home conservatory or custom greenhouse is not only healthy, it’s absolutely delightful.

Health Benefits No Matter the Weather

childrenWhat do you and your children do on a sad, rainy day? Sit around and watch tv, do homework, or drive you crazy! What about the fall or winter months when the harsh winter weather arrives or during the summer when the heat advisory is through the roof? Natural light is essential to your family’s well-being, not only for their physical health, but your mental health as well!

According to Dr. Phyllis Zee, a professor of neurology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and director of the Sleep Disorders Center at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, in an article at Health Day, “There is increasing evidence that exposure to natural light, during the day – particularly in the morning –is beneficial to your health via its effects on mood, alertness and metabolism.”

Greenhouses and glass conservatories allow everyone from infants on up to benefit from natural light year around. The natural light and the abundance of plants stimulate all the senses – seeing, hearing, touching, and smelling. By stimulating your senses in the natural environment it creates a sense of awareness and, in children especially, helps to develop capacities for creativity, problem solving, intellectual development, and gross motor skills.

The Benefits of Play

Conservatories and custom greenhouses provide natural light. They also offer protection from harsh winter weather, allowing fun outdoor -like play to continue all year long. Play in these protected special places allows children plenty of opportunities to be where plants, soil, and light mimic an almost natural environment. Play and learning of all sorts can take place in these marvelous spaces.

According to the Department of Education & Training in a recent article,

“Sensory stimulation derived from interacting with natural environments allows children to learn with all of their senses… in recent review of literature concerning children play outdoors… [There is a link between] time spent outdoors to increased physical activity, healthy development and overall wellbeing. Research also shows that children having trouble concentrating benefit from playing outdoors, as after playing these children are better able to concentrate on tasks.”

The glass conservatory creates an ideal way to bring the natural environment into the home and custom greenhouses can be designed to encourage children and adults to enjoy nature while protected from unforgiving weather.

Physical activity like hide and seek, creating Tiny Gardening Terrariums, trimming plants, planting and more are all possible in these, protected, almost-natural environments. Greenhouses and the conservatories mimic the outdoors, allowing the whole family to experience healthy benefits even when the wind is blowing and the outside air is cold and wet.

Kids in Conservatories and greenhouses

Play in a conservatory or greenhouse isn’t much different than play outside. Or it needn’t be. Even areas for safe rough-housing can be included. Certainly the light and the plants bring benefit to even the quiet activities that absorb the full attention of children.

When you couple great natural light with children at play you have an ideal combination because children benefit from both play and play in nature.

According to Richard Louv, 2008 Audubon Medal Recipient and author of Last Child in the Woods , reported in a Washington Post Article,  “(his book refers to) many studies that have shown that spending time in nature has tremendous health benefits, among them improved concentration, a greater ability to engage in creative play, an aid to help treat mental illness (in particular ADHD and children-in-greenhousedepression), and exercise that beats out organized sports with its hour-to-hour physical activity. Children who spend more time in nature develop better motor fitness and coordination, especially in balance and agility. And the benefits of the mind are not to be overlooked; greater time in nature can help children develop a healthy interior life, greater mental acuity, inventiveness, and sustained intellectual development.”

The greenhouse and glass conservatory offer additional ways to be almost outdoors and garner the same benefits. And play can be anything from a quiet place to read or be read to on to activates including planting seeds and plants and caring for them. Both greenhouses and glass conservatories bring nature closer to home for children. In fact, creating their own Tiny Gardening Terrariums allow kids to explore the science behind growing plants in an ecosystem, use their creativity, and learn about responsibility while keeping their ecosystem running!

The possibilities are endless under a glass conservatory or greenhouse. When it’s time to plan yours, we know you’ll be delighted with the lasting legacy you’re creating for your children and grandchildren., We’d be happy to talk with you and your family about a glass conservatory or custom greenhouse. Please fill out the contact us form or call us at: 410.479.4700.

 

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Opportunity for a Change in the Educational World

Posted September 28th, 2016 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Events, Insights, latest, Uncategorized
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Rise Richardson, Director of The Village School in Royalston, Massachusetts, talks about Philanthropic Investing, saying,

When they give to the Village School, high net worth individuals are investing in the future, both in terms of the opportunity for ‘normal’ childhoods, and in terms of changing the educational world.”

The Village School

The Village School is a wonder. In 1989 a group of parents, farmers, scientists, writers and local business people gathered and over time created a new kind of school.

It was designed to be a “…model for people in rural areas to give opportunities for community and kids to achieve,” according to Richardson.

village-school-kids-1Serving preschool through 6th grade, the school recognizes the need for children to be part of a community and to be connected to the farming, forestry, stewardship and conservation with the land around them. This is facilitated by bringing balance to the student’s physical, emotional, and mental capabilities.

Using mixed-age classrooms, the school take advantage of the fact that “kids learn from other kids,” she said.

From the start – their students are told they are leaders & held to a high standard, Richardson continued. “Our kids have a strong sense of confidence and know who they are and are eager about learning… they do not just study to get a good grade. The students are actually interested in the material and want to learn more.”

The first graduates from The Village School are now 26-27 years old. Most have gone off to the college of their dreams and have succeeded in their fields – they are leaders, according to Richardson.  “They take ownership and responsibility,” a skill taught at the school, she commented.

Funding and building

When the school was established it was housed in an old town-owned schoolhouse, nicely melding tradition with new ideas. However, the city has developed a need for that property and has set a tentative deadline of September 2017 the village school planfor the school to vacate.

Back in 1998 the school was able to buy some 55 acres on which to build a new, expanded school (in May 2017), and eventually, a future campus for adult learning.  The city’s needs created the opportunity for The Village School to start planning how to use their property.

Now the plans are in place, permits just issued, and groundbreaking for the new school is scheduled for Spring, 2017.

Funding and financing is in place, but subject to some strict deadlines. Richardson said,

Good news, we just raised another 200K!  We need 200K more to get to the total of 500K that the bank wants to see before their loan of 750K kicks in and we can break ground and start building. We are building the complete five classroom school for the low price of $1,800,000 (!) using local contractors and skilled volunteers.”

The sooner that additional $200,000 + can be raised, the sooner they can actually start building, subject to Massachusetts weather of course. Larger contributions can help free the school from the burden of a huge bank loan with large payments, so the school can focus energy and resources on children and developing programs for them.

Why we love this project!

We love what’s been done at The Village School. Even more impressive are their plans for the new campus. We support their goals of connecting kids to the land and teaching meaningful conservation and are impressed and delighted with their goal of endowed scholarships.

We were delighted to make an initial contribution of $15,000 to The Village School!

In many ways our commitment and support of both the Caroline County Public Schools and County Economic Development Department to assist in training and providing resources thorough their AMP program for high school students are similar because of their focus on The Village Schoolstudent achievement. Each one invests in our youth’s future and the future of our communities.

That’s why we are standing behind The Village School and encouraging everyone to speak with Rise Richardson to learn more about their efforts at 978 249 3505.

There is also the possibility of naming rights to their new school with the right contribution. Imagine the whole school named for someone you love and respect, or highlighting your company’s vision.

Discover more specifics about The Village School building plans here. You can also make a tax deductible donation on that page. For setting up substantial donations and pledges, contact the school directly.

At the Druid Hill Park Conservatory It’s All About the Light!

Posted August 11th, 2016 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Dynamic Glass, General, Insights, Travels
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What do you love most about these wondrous glass rooms?

Opened in August of 1888, the Druid Hill Park Conservatory in Baltimore, MD, is one of the oldest glass conservatories still in use in the United States. With its glass walls and glass roof it exemplifies the joy and beauty of light. Designed by architect George Aloysius Frederick, the original Palm House has some 175 windows and soars 50 feet high. It has long been considered an outstanding example of Victorian structural design. Next door is the smaller Orchid room which is also charming.

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Look closely and you’ll discover  that the window walls that make up the Palm House follow a lovely pattern. Entrance high frames filled with sparkling frames anchor the building to the land. Let your eye wander up and take in how the next two rows of frames are of different heights, topped off by frames holding arched panes of glass.

Perhaps not surprisingly, the attention to detail contributes significantly to the visual impact of the two original structures. Note too that each corner is softened by a slight flattening giving the illusion of gentle rounding.

All this, is of course, covered by the glass roof that curves up to the wind vein topped copula. Small wonder this conservatory is celebrated for its magical light all year round. Imagine enjoying a hot cup of tea while relaxing under the beauty of this elegant large glass roof. Or even snuggled warmly protected when clouds appear.  Could you imagine stargazing under the beauty of this large, elegant glass roof?

The Orchid room, though smaller, is similarly detailed. It echoes the larger structure without duplicating it. For instance, it lacks the glass roof but has the same sort of rounded frames and panes of glass.

Conservatories, also known as glass houses, are cherished because of the light they invite. Natural light makes us feel good; the sunlight is good for us. It’s the druid hill part 2combination of the light inviting glass and the strict attention to detail that leads to a love of conservatories and skylights, old and new.

Consider how inviting light with your own glass conservatory or magical skylight could brighten your home or business. We understand the extraordinary between light and attention to the details. It’s our passion. We’ll work with you to draw from the past while using the best of modern materials as together we create exactly the perfect way for you to welcome in the light.

Call us for a no-charge consultation at 1-410-479-4700 or fill out the form on our contact page.

What Do You Like Best About Old World Conservatories?

Posted August 4th, 2016 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Conservatory Projects, General, Insights, Travels, Uncategorized
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Many are drawn to the BEAUTY OF OLD WORLD CONSERVATORIES; some wonder why they are so drawn to what is obviously old fashioned design. We’ve thought a lot about why we too are so intrigued with, for example, the grand Conservatory of Flowers in San Francisco or the modest and charming half-round, glass roofed conservatory at the Mark Twain (Samuel Clements) house in near Hartford Connecticut.

Conservatory of Flowers

We’ve noticed some consistent themes in our appreciations.

The first is that ARCHITECTURE IS ART. Sure, it deals with the facts of physics and the preciseness of engineering, but at its best, architecture is made great when it includes the practical yet moves beyond toward the sublime. This type of thinking is exemplified in many of the old world glass houses and it started with hand-drawn plans similar to what we do today. The intimacy of putting ink on paper allowed a CREATIVE AWARENESS of each element of the construction that is so often ignored and missing in today’s emphasis on costs and speed.

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The second observation is the INCREDIBLE ATTENTION TO DETAIL that became possible with at the start of the industrial revolution. That was a magical period when the craftsmanship of old world building styles spilled over into the sudden ability to replicate beauty. It was during this period – roughly the second half of the 1800s and the first quarter of the 1900s – that you find not only the strength and versatility of cast iron, but cast iron decorated with charming outlines of birds, and four-leaf clovers stamped into steel.

It was also the era when glass became a strong, integral part of the structure itself. The seemingly fragile transparent material adding strength and expanding possibilities of light and warmth to even the coldest regions of the world. The glass conservatory was indeed magic and still is.

We at Tanglewood have taken more than a few techniques and attitudes from that glorious past forward to today, building glass conservatories and skylights that combine the best of beauty and construction details. For more information about how we continue this tradition, CLICK HERE to read our brochure or give us a call at 410.479.4700.