Great Conservatories of the 19th Century & The Architecture Behind Them

Posted October 26th, 2017 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Community, Events, Insights, latest, Lectures, Preservation Maryland
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Will you be attending?

Alan Stein says that the more he learned about building conservatories, the more impressed he became.

The co-founder of Tanglewood Conservatories with his wife, Nancy Virts, Alan will give a lecture on “Great Conservatories of the 19th Century & The Architecture Behind Them” at 6 p.m. Nov. 2 at the Rawlings Conservatory in Baltimore. Wine and light fare will be served at 5:30 p.m.

Joining Alan will be Daniel Russoniello, AIA, of Archer & Buchanan Architecture in Philadelphia. Dan has many years of experience in planning and design of institutional and commercial projects. He has worked with botanical gardens around the country and will speak about the relevance of conservatories in the modern age.

 “Conservatories are not well understood,” Alan said, “and the importance and impact they had on architecture is not well appreciated.” He said he’ll “take people back to when they were first invented, the forces behind their development … and the sociological, technological impacts they’ve had on art and architecture as well as everything from city planning to shopping.

An architect and builder, he said he always liked building things. He was asked to design and build a conservatory. “So we figured out how to build it. And then, somebody else asked for one. After the second one, we fell in love with them.” Tanglewood was founded about 25 years ago. Alan has also written a book, “Conservatories,” that covers the historical development and modern relevance of the conservatory, topics he’ll address Nov. 2.

The Rawlings Conservatory opened in 1888. It is the second-oldest steel framed-and-glass building still in use in the United States. Alan was visiting the Rawlings Conservatory some years ago and wanted to help preserve it and help it grow, hence his lecture, which benefits the conservatory.

People are still building conservatories now. The technology has really changed. Why are people still building conservatories? There must be something important about the role that they play and what they are used for,” he said.

You can learn more about that role at his talk on Nov. 2. He said, “It’s going to be really interesting.”

For information and tickets to the lecture, visit www.rawlingsconservatory.org.

 

 

 

 

How can you change the lives of a community?

Posted May 25th, 2016 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Client Stories, Conservatory Projects, Events, Gardening, Greenhouses, Preservation Maryland, Uncategorized
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In 1999 Brookside Gardens created a strategic, master plan to transform their gardens into a world-class destination. The first phase in their plan called to simply pave an unused space near the visitor’s center enlarging the parking lot, but Brookside’s landscape architect Ching-Fang and her team, Stephanie Oberle, Phil Normandy, and Ellen Bennett ENVISIONED SOMETHING MUCH GREATER – an integrated parking and garden landscape – parking AS a landscape!

With the help of several generous donors, beautiful elements, such as a waterway and gatehouse, were able to bring life to their vision. Made of ALL NATURAL, ORGANIC MATERIALS, from the stone brick wall to the beautiful planted flowers, all elements resting in this entryway has a purpose in the gardens, including the gatehouse inspired by Tanglewood’s modern-styled custom greenhouse!

“This particular gatehouse, designed by Tanglewood Conservatories, was designed to resemble a greenhouse. At night it evokes images of a lantern at the entrance, a beacon lighting the way to a beautiful garden experience… and adding a compelling new garden element.”

-Brookside Gardens

 

Brookside Gatehouse_Copyright

Brookside’s vision for this project was to create an inviting and inspiring space that welcomes people to the gardens and fully embraces the visitor’s functional needs.

“We wanted the visitor center to become the heart of the gardens and extend Brookside’s horticulture and education,” Phil and Ching-Fang said. “We saw the gatehouse as our opportunity to start developing a quality design aesthetic. This is why we chose Tanglewood to design the gatehouse. It is a perfect match to its setting. We are delighted with the results.”

 

Great Challenges Bring Great Rewards

According to Stephanie, Brookside Gardens’ Director, their BIGGEST CHALLENGE was fundraising. Although they had a steep learning curve with fundraising and the creation and management of the project as a whole, Brookside’s staff, volunteers, and donors were dedicated to bringing this center to fruition. According to the team,

“The staff and volunteers are truly dedicated to Brookside Gardens and the project hit close to home for everyone. We are passionate about these gardens and everything we stand for.”

IF THEY COULD DO IT OVER AGAIN, the team said they would have asked a lot more questions. This was the first time they have completed a project of this magnitude. Between fundraising, lead time changes, and roadblocks, this first project brought on some great challenges but it also brought great reward.

This great change within Brookside turned out beautifully. We were not surprised we were able to work so well with Brookside Gardens. After all, our founders, Nancy Virts and Alan Stein, were married there over 20 years ago!

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Moving forward

Stephanie says their team is wiser and more knowledgeable about how to take on future projects of this magnitude. Next on their list is a GROWING GREENHOUSE roughly 10,000sq.ft. and a new CONSERVATORY to replace their now 50 year old beauty! Stephanie tells us,

The estimate for the new conservatory, one that matches all our dreams, is around $25 million. Obviously, more fundraising is on our horizon,”

For more information about Brookside or your project, GIVE US A CALL at 410.479.4700 or fill out our contact form!

Are You Passionate About Helping Kids Achieve?

Posted April 6th, 2016 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Events, Preservation Maryland, Uncategorized, Untangled Minds Foundation
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AMP

Did you know students can have a rewarding job without a college degree?

Did you know advanced manufacturing companies across the United States are looking for passionate, skilled craftspeople to carry on traditional trades work? Unfortunately, many students lack the resources and training needed to successfully master a trade, creating a skills gap in the American workforce.

Bringing Students & Businesses Together

“After our field trip to Tanglewood and working with your craftsman, my students have not stopped talking about how they cannot wait to go back to Tanglewood and learn more about the trade!”

– Teacher at the Caroline County & Technology Center

Real-life experience, lifelong friendships, networking opportunities and endless fun learning the tricks of the trade from some of the industry leaders here on the Eastern Shore – this is what Tanglewood Conservatories aims to bring to students.

How are we going to accomplish this?

Tanglewood Conservatories has partnered with Caroline County Public Schools and Caroline County Economic Development to create the Advanced Manufacturing and Production Technology program (AMP), a high-level program dedicated to INSPIRING and EMPOWERING high school students seeking a future in advanced manufacturing.

Get an inside look at our program HERE!

Student&Wood

Did You Know?

  • U.S. manufacturers are responsible for 47% of total U.S. exports.
  • In 2014, the average manufacturing worker in the U.S. earned $79,553 annually, including pay and benefits.
  • More than HALF A MILLION skilled manufacturing jobs remain unfilled due to the labor skills gap in the U.S.
  • Over the next decade, nearly 3.5 million manufacturing jobs will likely be needed, and 2 million are expected to go unfilled due to the skills gap.
  • “84 percent of manufacturing executives agree there is a talent shortage in US manufacturing…” according to Craig Giffi, vice chairman, Deloitte LLP, and US automotive sector leader.

Click the links to read more from our references.

Changing the World

The program will launch in the fall of 2016! READ BELOW to see our contributors!

  1. Caroline County Economic Development Corporation
  2. Tanglewood Conservatories
  3. Combined Technology Solutions
  4. Caroline County Chamber of Commerce
  5. Maryland State Department of Education
  6. Caroline County Public Schools
  7. Hinkley Yachts
  8. Knaggs Guitars

Conservatory Auction benefits Preservation Maryland Organization

Posted November 16th, 2011 by Alan Stein and filed in General, Preservation Maryland, Wye House
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I recently wrote about one of our beautiful conservatories being up for auction to benefit the Preservation Maryland organization. The fundraising event was held on the site of the historic Wye House in Talbot County, MD. The auction included many wonderful items featuring the best of each county comprising Maryland’s scenic Eastern Shore. The beautiful 21’ x 13’ Georgian-style conservatory was certainly a stand-out among the items up for bid at the event. I’m thrilled to report that the conservatory will soon have a new home and a loving family to enjoy it.

The event was held on a gorgeous sunny Sunday afternoon. We certainly couldn’t have asked for better weather! The approximately 300 people in attendance at the event were treated to great music and delicious local fare, including oysters on the half shell and Maryland’s famous Smith Island Cake.

Wye House Live Music

 

Wye HouseThe Wye House in Talbot County, MD

Read more about The Wye House

Tours of the Wye House Farm and its famed orangery were provided to guests at the event. We took the opportunity to walk in the actual footsteps of those great artisans and prominent historical figures, like Frederick Douglass, who tread this same ground before us. As the sun began to set, we watched the shadows grow long from within the majestic 226-year-old structure.

Interior of Wye House

As we said before, our whole Tanglewood team is thrilled to have one of our own conservatories being used to help preserve other pieces of our history. We truly hope that each of the conservatories we create today will become a precious part of the history of the families around the globe whose homes they grace.