70 Percent of medicines come from the most common of plants. Why not grow some for yourself?

Posted January 25th, 2017 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Client Stories, Gardening, Greenhouses, Uncategorized, Windows & Doors
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When people think about adding a greenhouse to their property they are usually thinking about growing fresh or exotic foods, or flowers in mid winter or just extending their growing season. And a greenhouse will make all these things possible. Often overlooked is the ability to grow some of your own medicine.

Have you considered a living green wall?

Our partner, Dea Schofield, writes about growing your own medicine in a blog she titled Are YOU Growing Your Medicine this Winter? Dea is an expert horticulturist we met through a client who was an avid plant collector.

Dea managed his exclusive collection of edible plants. He was passionate about nature and wanted a greenhouse to show off his extensive plant collection. To relate to their existing home we designed a “Horticultural Jewel Box” as it had often been referred that combined all the elements of a gardener’s dream; a seating nook, delectable and edible plants, overlooking the water, and a little touch of the client’s unique design touch that made this greenhouse so unique.

To allow the greenhouse to house a multitude of plant species it required substantial heating and pumping equipment to make the climate consistent year ‘round. To hide the system and still keep the integrity of the design, we integrated a wall of living plants rather than the typical stick-it-outside-and-hope-no-one-notices approach. Few people realize that plant wall actually hides the mechanical equipment! Our plant collector loved the solution, and loves showing it off to visitors.

Dea talks more about the plants our collector grew and more in her blog “Difficult Challenges & Great Rewards.”

Wild Medicine

Dea is not alone in recognizing the value of medicinal plants. Starting Jan. 21, 2016 the Enid Haupt Conservatory at the New York Botanical Gardens is hosting Wild Medicine in the Tropics. Many of the plants exhibited there would work well in a home greenhouse and you can even get some tips and tricks on which are best for your area!


Well respected Dr. Mercola points out that few  people recognize that roughly 70 percent of the medicines we use in the U.S. are derived from plants and other products from nature. He lists seven underappreciated medicinal plants, some of which you may already be growing. All of them, listed below, can also be grown in a greenhouse year around.

·       Ginger ·       Peppermint
·       Garlic ·       Lavender
·       Chamomile ·       Thyme
·       Dandelion

 

A greenhouse with all the plants you cherish, from flowers through edibles and on to medicinal is a magical place, for you, your family and for your legacy.

Now’s the best time to start planning your conservatory or greenhouse so download our e-brochure or schedule a no obligation consultation with our team to learn more!

What does Tanglewood’s Commitment to Building a World Class Team Mean to You?

Posted January 11th, 2017 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Uncategorized
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In the New Year, we are taking action to transform our already great team into a truly World Class, dynamite team. Our vision is to empower everyone we serve through transformational living spaces that will awaken and delight for generations. Our goal is to be better stewards of our talents for creating the most luxurious glass conservatories in the world and provide the highest standard of service to our clients and partners

Business Fundamentals for Success

Alan Stein, co-founder and co-owner of Tanglewood Conservatories began his career as a woodworker. When he thinks back on how he came to lead the business that has re-kindled the love of glass conservatories he says, “When I started the company years ago, I could do anything our team could do. I would often pick up a tool, and show them how to do it.”

“Those days are long gone,” Alan admits. “Now when I take complicated conservatory designs to our production department, the team tells me how they would like to build them. It’s a group that exudes a real ‘can do’ energy and enthusiasm.”

Tanglewood has recognized that in addition to creating the glass conservatories they are so well known for, to increase their already high standard of excellence and service, they need to expand their understanding of how to develop an elite business. To that end, they’ve been working with Executive Business Coach Mark Boersma to learn what makes an outstanding business so outstanding, and precisely how we can implement that in our business.

Understanding these fundamentals allows our staff and management to put systems in place that help every member of the team make sure not only are they doing what they should, but that nothing gets overlooked – every day in all ways possible. The result is an elite product and service you deserve.

 

Success in Numbers

As we expand our knowledge in all phases of our business it opens up the opportunity to form partnerships to not only empower some of our dreams and goals, but also passions of others in our community. One way we are helping to empower our community is through shared passions to empower kids by teaching them entrepreneurial and life success skills necessary to compete in the global business environment. Together with Caroline County Public Schools and local business owners, we’ve developed the AMP program to actively get students more involved in the community, thinking like business owners, and developing their skills beyond the technical need to do a job; they will also have the emotional intelligence to successfully work with a team and manage operations and teams efficiently and effectively through high level leadership skills. We are working hard to ensure students have the best chance of success in the workforce as either employees or successful entrepreneurs.

We soon will be reaching more kids; we recently met and partnered with The Crossing, an Indiana state accredited academic school program dedicated to show struggling students how to become contributing members of their communities. The Crossing has a vision:

 To transform lives through education by focusing on the heart and mind

The Crossing has developed an engaging entrepreneurial system that not only teaches students the technical skills to do the hands on work, but combines their training with essential everyday life skills to develop students beyond expectations and make them an ideal member of any company; this is what Tanglewood is working to accomplish with the AMP program

Continually learning and strengthening our team’s skills and developing innovative designs are how we create a unique journey for you as you design and create your conservatory.

We hope 2017 is your best year yet and we look forward to enjoying it with you! Please, feel free to get in touch. You can call us at 410.479.4700 or use the form on our contact page.

 

Happy New Year!

Team Tanglewood

How can we turn our dreams into reality?

Posted December 14th, 2016 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Uncategorized
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Palmhouse ConservatoryGoals, informed by life vision are recognized ways successful people achieve what they want. It’s the way dreams turn into reality.

Daydreams inform our goals

Although daydreaming is frowned on by some, others recognize daydreams as the key to creativity. Last year, an essay in The New York Times reminded us that Albert Einstein was known for his daydreaming – his thought experiments.

EntreArchitect™ quoted motivator and coach, Tony Robbins as saying, “… Brainstorm everything worth pursuing. Then pick a goal that excites you the most, something that will get you up early and keep you up late…”

We dream with our clients

As we work with our clients and examine how the best results happen, we notice that we always start with their dream and work make their dream come true through our craftsmanship and attention to detail. This is true in every case. Without the dream, nothing would be built.conservatory dreams

Of course, the fruition of the dream starts when someone chooses to move forward. It’s in the moving forward that dreams begin to manifest, first in design and the plans and then in the actual creation of the glass conservatory or magnificent skylight, or exciting greenhouse.

Small step by small step the dream turns into a goal, complete with plans and deadlines; before long the dream is realized, often in ways that are better than first imagined.

We know that in every case someone has to begin. You can start on making your dream of a conservatory or a special pool house, or a dome that invites light by getting in touch with us. Call us at: 1-410-479-4700

Or fill in the form on our Contact page.

Do you know how glass conservatories can enhance your children’s health?

Posted October 5th, 2016 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Greenhouses, Insights, Uncategorized
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For many, glass conservatories and greenhouses are valued primarily for the availability of natural light they bring, particularly in the fall and winter months. What most families don’t realize is the major positive impact conservatories and greenhouses can offer to families anywhere in the world.

Although the tendency is to think of these spaces as primarily adult places, children of all ages can benefit greatly by spending time in there as well. In fact, family time in a home conservatory or custom greenhouse is not only healthy, it’s absolutely delightful.

Health Benefits No Matter the Weather

childrenWhat do you and your children do on a sad, rainy day? Sit around and watch tv, do homework, or drive you crazy! What about the fall or winter months when the harsh winter weather arrives or during the summer when the heat advisory is through the roof? Natural light is essential to your family’s well-being, not only for their physical health, but your mental health as well!

According to Dr. Phyllis Zee, a professor of neurology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and director of the Sleep Disorders Center at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, in an article at Health Day, “There is increasing evidence that exposure to natural light, during the day – particularly in the morning –is beneficial to your health via its effects on mood, alertness and metabolism.”

Greenhouses and glass conservatories allow everyone from infants on up to benefit from natural light year around. The natural light and the abundance of plants stimulate all the senses – seeing, hearing, touching, and smelling. By stimulating your senses in the natural environment it creates a sense of awareness and, in children especially, helps to develop capacities for creativity, problem solving, intellectual development, and gross motor skills.

The Benefits of Play

Conservatories and custom greenhouses provide natural light. They also offer protection from harsh winter weather, allowing fun outdoor -like play to continue all year long. Play in these protected special places allows children plenty of opportunities to be where plants, soil, and light mimic an almost natural environment. Play and learning of all sorts can take place in these marvelous spaces.

According to the Department of Education & Training in a recent article,

“Sensory stimulation derived from interacting with natural environments allows children to learn with all of their senses… in recent review of literature concerning children play outdoors… [There is a link between] time spent outdoors to increased physical activity, healthy development and overall wellbeing. Research also shows that children having trouble concentrating benefit from playing outdoors, as after playing these children are better able to concentrate on tasks.”

The glass conservatory creates an ideal way to bring the natural environment into the home and custom greenhouses can be designed to encourage children and adults to enjoy nature while protected from unforgiving weather.

Physical activity like hide and seek, creating Tiny Gardening Terrariums, trimming plants, planting and more are all possible in these, protected, almost-natural environments. Greenhouses and the conservatories mimic the outdoors, allowing the whole family to experience healthy benefits even when the wind is blowing and the outside air is cold and wet.

Kids in Conservatories and greenhouses

Play in a conservatory or greenhouse isn’t much different than play outside. Or it needn’t be. Even areas for safe rough-housing can be included. Certainly the light and the plants bring benefit to even the quiet activities that absorb the full attention of children.

When you couple great natural light with children at play you have an ideal combination because children benefit from both play and play in nature.

According to Richard Louv, 2008 Audubon Medal Recipient and author of Last Child in the Woods , reported in a Washington Post Article,  “(his book refers to) many studies that have shown that spending time in nature has tremendous health benefits, among them improved concentration, a greater ability to engage in creative play, an aid to help treat mental illness (in particular ADHD and children-in-greenhousedepression), and exercise that beats out organized sports with its hour-to-hour physical activity. Children who spend more time in nature develop better motor fitness and coordination, especially in balance and agility. And the benefits of the mind are not to be overlooked; greater time in nature can help children develop a healthy interior life, greater mental acuity, inventiveness, and sustained intellectual development.”

The greenhouse and glass conservatory offer additional ways to be almost outdoors and garner the same benefits. And play can be anything from a quiet place to read or be read to on to activates including planting seeds and plants and caring for them. Both greenhouses and glass conservatories bring nature closer to home for children. In fact, creating their own Tiny Gardening Terrariums allow kids to explore the science behind growing plants in an ecosystem, use their creativity, and learn about responsibility while keeping their ecosystem running!

The possibilities are endless under a glass conservatory or greenhouse. When it’s time to plan yours, we know you’ll be delighted with the lasting legacy you’re creating for your children and grandchildren., We’d be happy to talk with you and your family about a glass conservatory or custom greenhouse. Please fill out the contact us form or call us at: 410.479.4700.

 

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Opportunity for a Change in the Educational World

Posted September 28th, 2016 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Events, Insights, latest, Uncategorized
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Rise Richardson, Director of The Village School in Royalston, Massachusetts, talks about Philanthropic Investing, saying,

When they give to the Village School, high net worth individuals are investing in the future, both in terms of the opportunity for ‘normal’ childhoods, and in terms of changing the educational world.”

The Village School

The Village School is a wonder. In 1989 a group of parents, farmers, scientists, writers and local business people gathered and over time created a new kind of school.

It was designed to be a “…model for people in rural areas to give opportunities for community and kids to achieve,” according to Richardson.

village-school-kids-1Serving preschool through 6th grade, the school recognizes the need for children to be part of a community and to be connected to the farming, forestry, stewardship and conservation with the land around them. This is facilitated by bringing balance to the student’s physical, emotional, and mental capabilities.

Using mixed-age classrooms, the school take advantage of the fact that “kids learn from other kids,” she said.

From the start – their students are told they are leaders & held to a high standard, Richardson continued. “Our kids have a strong sense of confidence and know who they are and are eager about learning… they do not just study to get a good grade. The students are actually interested in the material and want to learn more.”

The first graduates from The Village School are now 26-27 years old. Most have gone off to the college of their dreams and have succeeded in their fields – they are leaders, according to Richardson.  “They take ownership and responsibility,” a skill taught at the school, she commented.

Funding and building

When the school was established it was housed in an old town-owned schoolhouse, nicely melding tradition with new ideas. However, the city has developed a need for that property and has set a tentative deadline of September 2017 the village school planfor the school to vacate.

Back in 1998 the school was able to buy some 55 acres on which to build a new, expanded school (in May 2017), and eventually, a future campus for adult learning.  The city’s needs created the opportunity for The Village School to start planning how to use their property.

Now the plans are in place, permits just issued, and groundbreaking for the new school is scheduled for Spring, 2017.

Funding and financing is in place, but subject to some strict deadlines. Richardson said,

Good news, we just raised another 200K!  We need 200K more to get to the total of 500K that the bank wants to see before their loan of 750K kicks in and we can break ground and start building. We are building the complete five classroom school for the low price of $1,800,000 (!) using local contractors and skilled volunteers.”

The sooner that additional $200,000 + can be raised, the sooner they can actually start building, subject to Massachusetts weather of course. Larger contributions can help free the school from the burden of a huge bank loan with large payments, so the school can focus energy and resources on children and developing programs for them.

Why we love this project!

We love what’s been done at The Village School. Even more impressive are their plans for the new campus. We support their goals of connecting kids to the land and teaching meaningful conservation and are impressed and delighted with their goal of endowed scholarships.

We were delighted to make an initial contribution of $15,000 to The Village School!

In many ways our commitment and support of both the Caroline County Public Schools and County Economic Development Department to assist in training and providing resources thorough their AMP program for high school students are similar because of their focus on The Village Schoolstudent achievement. Each one invests in our youth’s future and the future of our communities.

That’s why we are standing behind The Village School and encouraging everyone to speak with Rise Richardson to learn more about their efforts at 978 249 3505.

There is also the possibility of naming rights to their new school with the right contribution. Imagine the whole school named for someone you love and respect, or highlighting your company’s vision.

Discover more specifics about The Village School building plans here. You can also make a tax deductible donation on that page. For setting up substantial donations and pledges, contact the school directly.

A Tiny Gardening Terrarium

Posted August 25th, 2016 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Dea Digs, Gardening, Uncategorized
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 terrarium
T here is a fascination today with creating things in miniature. Micro houses, micro cars, micro technology. Even dog breeds can fit in a ‘teacup’. This is also true in the world of growing plants under glass. Glass containers have sprouted like loveable weeds in any store that has a reason to carry them. From three-inch glass bromeliad balls, to elaborate greenhouses made small, you can find a suitable repository for your favorite little plant. And why not have a micro-environment within the larger space of your Tanglewood conservatory!
A Bit of History
In 1842, Doctor Nathanial Bagshaw Ward, who had a keen interest in botany and entomology, discovered  that some plants and animals could be happily grown inside glass containers (the sphinx moth that he’d been observing, when he noticed a fern spore had germinated in the same vessel, was not credited). Ward went on to develop varying versions of the Wardian case—which we call terrariums today.
About Terrariums
A terrariums defining feature is that moisture can be kept relatively constant, which is a bonus for more persnickety specimens. For instance, if you have low humidity in your conservatory, a terrarium is the way to go if you just have to have a few specimens needing moist air. From desert plants, to aquatics, you can create an environment within glass that will thrive for ages.
There is a wonderful word for this that mashes Greek and German: Microlandschaft. It’s quite popular today to create little landscapes—complete with miniature people, animals and things. My current favorite terrarium plant is a tiny, tussock-like philodendron variety called ‘Pincushion’. It is possibly the most perfect plant I’ve ever worked with, as it continuously looks fantastic and grows at a slow to moderate rate that stays in perfect proportion to the two-gallon covered glass urn it has called home for two years.
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Other great plants are bromeliads (aka air plants), small cacti, cryptanthus (aka Earth Stars), various begonias and gesnariads, small ferns, mosses, a few orchids, and many more. One can even have an aquatic version with the oh-so- easy to grow Hygrophila difformis (aka Water Wisteria). I have one with a betta fish in a one-gallon urn with no filtration—both fish and plant are thriving with the occasional partial water change. Other variations on the terrarium theme are the paludarium (terrestrial and aquatic combined), vivarium (plants and animals combined) and aquarium.
Beauty in Small Places
What makes terrarium gardening so wonderful is that it is possible for anyone, weather you live in a tiny bedsit or a massive mansion. Occasional misting can be all that is required for long periods depending on what you grow. There are numerous books and online sources dedicated to terrariums, and no matter your tastes—from modern minimalism to exquisite Victorian finery, you can find the ‘Wardian’ case to fit. Your creativity is all that’s needed to add that microlandshaft that will become a fascinating conversation piece.
Enjoy! Share a picture of your new terrarium with us at marketing@tanglewoodconservatories.com!
By Dea Schofield

What Do You Like Best About Old World Conservatories?

Posted August 4th, 2016 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Conservatory Projects, General, Insights, Travels, Uncategorized
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Many are drawn to the BEAUTY OF OLD WORLD CONSERVATORIES; some wonder why they are so drawn to what is obviously old fashioned design. We’ve thought a lot about why we too are so intrigued with, for example, the grand Conservatory of Flowers in San Francisco or the modest and charming half-round, glass roofed conservatory at the Mark Twain (Samuel Clements) house in near Hartford Connecticut.

Conservatory of Flowers

We’ve noticed some consistent themes in our appreciations.

The first is that ARCHITECTURE IS ART. Sure, it deals with the facts of physics and the preciseness of engineering, but at its best, architecture is made great when it includes the practical yet moves beyond toward the sublime. This type of thinking is exemplified in many of the old world glass houses and it started with hand-drawn plans similar to what we do today. The intimacy of putting ink on paper allowed a CREATIVE AWARENESS of each element of the construction that is so often ignored and missing in today’s emphasis on costs and speed.

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The second observation is the INCREDIBLE ATTENTION TO DETAIL that became possible with at the start of the industrial revolution. That was a magical period when the craftsmanship of old world building styles spilled over into the sudden ability to replicate beauty. It was during this period – roughly the second half of the 1800s and the first quarter of the 1900s – that you find not only the strength and versatility of cast iron, but cast iron decorated with charming outlines of birds, and four-leaf clovers stamped into steel.

It was also the era when glass became a strong, integral part of the structure itself. The seemingly fragile transparent material adding strength and expanding possibilities of light and warmth to even the coldest regions of the world. The glass conservatory was indeed magic and still is.

We at Tanglewood have taken more than a few techniques and attitudes from that glorious past forward to today, building glass conservatories and skylights that combine the best of beauty and construction details. For more information about how we continue this tradition, CLICK HERE to read our brochure or give us a call at 410.479.4700.

A Glasshouse Wonder in the Czech Republic

Posted July 27th, 2016 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Uncategorized
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How many ways can a glass conservatory be used?

Hluboká nad Vltavou is the large name of a tiny 100 year old town with a population of about 5,000 in the Southern Bohemian area of the Czech Republic.  The town’s castle, first built in the Gothic style in the 13th century, has been rebuilt numerous times. The latest version is the result of Johann Adolf II von Schwarzenberg ordering it reconstructed in the Romantic style of Windsor Castle in England in the 19th century.

As part of that reconstruction a charming glasshouse was added, bridging the castle with the riding school. As far as we know, this is a unique use for such a structure, but it does conjure some interesting ideas.

The construction of the glasshouse is a fine example of combining intricate cast iron with glass made possible by the beginning of the industrial revolution. The cast iron allowed lovely detailing on larger pieces; you’ll see pillars strewn with flowers and other decorations actually cast into the iron that supports the glass roof. Part of the reason for the conservatory was to create a warm space for the winter garden.

The detailing is amazing. Not just in the (very expensive in those times) detailing in the cast iron orten formed into small, decorative shapes, but in the unique  stairway. Wrought iron makes up the stair which has then been covered by glass!

Care was taken to make the outside of this glasshouse visually match the castle; the inside looks whimsical but is strongly built to last while it protects the garden.  There are more construction details here.

The castle, its glasshouse, and the surrounding gardens make an exciting destination. The castle is considered by many as one of the most beautiful in the Czech Republic and is a National Cultural Monument of the Czech Republic. “The contrast between the heavy masonry work and the filigree cast-iron ornamentation is a shape-forming architectural element.”

It can be fun, if you visit the Glasshouse at Hluboká, to see what features you might want to duplicate or what ideas they may spark for a conservatory of your own.

What we at Tanglewood so love about this glasshouse is the contrast between the outside and the inside coupled with the details – obviously they loved details as much as we do.

Conservatories Around the World

Posted July 13th, 2016 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Domes and Cupolas, Dynamic Glass, General, Steel Structures, Travels, Uncategorized
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The Marjorie McNeely Conservatory – St Paul, Minnesota, originally known as the Como Park Conservatory, sits on about half an acre of the almost 400 acre campus of the Como Park Zoo in St. Paul, Minnesota. Designed by German-born architect Frederick Nussbaumer, Nussbaumer modeled this Victorian style glass domed conservatory after Kew Gardens in London. Completed in 1915, it is one of the few glass and wood conservatories left from that era.

The Marjorie McNeely Conservatory is some 60,000 square feet, its footprint well over an acre (43,560 sq. ft.) and anchors the gardens. You’ll find, for example, a large collection of Bonsai plants, a continuation of St. Paul’s annual fascination with the chrysanthemum plus the marvelous Palm Dome. Here over 150 varieties of palms are on display along with a color selection of orchids.

For more details about this marvelous conservatory confection, click here. With every visit, this Conservatory is guaranteed to inspire you for your own conservatory. View their website to plan your visit – they always have something extraordinary going on!

 

Bellagio Conservatory and Botanical Gardens – Las Vegas, Nevada – The Vegas Strip seems an unlikely location for a lovely glass conservatory, but the Bellagio Hotel is exactly where you’ll find one. This is a true oasis of calm. Referred to as a “14,000 square foot floral playground…”  it lives up to its billing with changes in the flora every season plus in celebration of the Chinese New Year.

Of course, its soaring 55 ft glass ceiling perfectly sets the stage for a truly over-the-top ever changing display. Not only that, there is no charge to wander through this earthy space.

“Seasonal display” hardly describes what the talented team of horticulturists actually produce. Just for example, the theme of the 2016 summer production was “Under the Sea.” It consisted of some 80,000 blooming plants, including 6,000 tulips weekly. Interspersed were colorful statues of seahorses and with a delightful collection of jelly-fish like installations hanging from the glorious glass ceiling.

If you visit Sin City, make a point to see and experience exactly how a glass conservatory can change a frenetic atmosphere into a peaceful and restorative setting – food for thought as you think about a conservatory of your own. This marvelous spot is more than worth the trip!

 

Flower Dome + Cloud Forest, Singapore – Two amazing conservatories, both located in Singapore’s Gardens by the Bay, offer perpetual spring in the Flower Dome and the mystery of a high mountain Cloud Forest.

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Flower Dorm was listed by the 2015 Guinness World Records as the world’s largest glass greenhouse, made up of some 3,332 glass panels of 42 different shapes and sizes. With almost 3 acres under glass it comes by its record honestly. It’s volume is equally startling – about as much as 75 Olympic size swimming pools.

Inside the climate is kept a balmy 73-77 degrees with humidity of about 80 percent. That precise temperature control is what allows the amazing variety of plants, from succulents to olive groves and everything in between to grow there in its various gardens – there’s even a bistro that features edible plants.

Cloud Forest is perhaps even more spectacular. The mountain inside rises to well over 100 feet and is designed to mimic an altitude of about 6,500 feet high. There is an impressive waterfall which has a viewing deck near the top.

You reach the top via a path known as the Cloud Walk. It’s built out from the mountain in an almost undulating fashion giving you a close-up view in some places, and a bit more distance in others.

The temperature and humidity are controlled to let you experience the mist so often found in a forest that high. You are, of course, surrounded by an amazing number of tropical trees and other plants.

This spectacular conservatory has 2,577 glass panels of 690 shapes! Together, Flower Dome and Cloud Forest are a conservatory experience not to be missed.  They will awe and inspire you.

Is the Eden Project really a Conservatory?

Posted June 22nd, 2016 by Nicole Mihalos and filed in Domes and Cupolas, Events, Insights, latest, Travels, Uncategorized
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Is the Eden Project really a conservatory?

It’s hard to be sure if the collection of biomes in Cornwell, England counts as a conservatory. Yet that is exactly what it’s designed to do, CONSERVE and EXPLORE plants collected from around the world.

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The main structure is built largely of hexagonal and pentagonal 3-layer plastic cells joined together as GEODESIC DOMES. The insulated plastic that make up the domes work to create TWO SPECIFIC AND AUTHENTIC ENVIRONMENTS – one reproduces a TROPICAL RAINFOREST and the other duplicates the MEDITERRANEAN climate. Lovely glass inserts add more than a touch of beauty to the constructions and harken back to the glass history of conservatories.

Developed with the idea of providing multiple ways to explore those environments by building a community through sustainable living, the Eden Project is involved in RESEARCH AND TESTING around the world. Many of their efforts are aimed at CONSERVATION. They have, for example, projects to conserve redwoods, promote eco-friendly coffees and a deep geothermal energy project.  Every project involves both research and teaching the results.

In addition to investigating the sights, you can explore, learn water saving tips, get married, hear live music, discover new plants, and eat wonderful food you’re unlikely to find anywhere else. Built in a clay pit, the Eden project defines itself as:

 “…an educational charity (that) connects us with each other and the living world, exploring how we can work towards a better future.”

There are also many OPPORTUNITIES TO TAKE CLASSES for kids and adults. You can even, for example, study for a university-level degree in Horticulture, Event Management and/or Contemporary StoryTelling and Performance. According to The Guinness Book of Records, Eden Project is the world’s largest greenhouse containing easily over a million plants. It also has the largest rainforest outside of normal rainforest territory. Who would have guessed all this would be located in Cornwall, England?

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Eden Project’s website reflects the hip and cutting edge of this unusual conservatory’s attitude while giving you information that runs the gambit from fascinating (in The Core building) to practical including monthly gardening tips.

Spend some time on the site before you visit or allow for the serendipitous once you’re there – either way, your visit is apt to be educational, and just plain fun. Be willing to be surprised and inspired as you recognize something at Eden Project that would be perfect for your own installation.

You can START YOUR OWN CONSERVATORY PROJECT with a call to us at: 410.479.4700 or fill out our contact form.